Rita Hayworth

rita_hayworth_wallpaper01[1]

She had a perfect figure and a smile that could light up the Statue of Liberty. But the feature that most people will probably remember is her hair, whipping around in “Gilda“, cascading over her shoulders on the cover of many magazines and appeared in thousands of World War II pinup posters. If Jean Harlow was Hollywood‘s love goddess in the ’30s and Marilyn Monroe in the ’50s, the ’40s ideal was Rita Hayworth, who’s tragical life ended in 1987 at 68 in Manhattan of complications from Alzheimer‘s disease.

Rita-Hayworth-as-Gilda-rita-hayworth-16044858-1200-908

“Every man I knew went to bed with Gilda… and woke up with me.”
Rita Hayworth

circa 1942: Portrait of American actor Rita Hayworth (1918 - 1987) pulling back her hair with one hand and wearing a striped shirt.

Hayworth was born in Brooklyn, New York in 1918 as Margarita Carmen Cansino, the oldest child of two dancers. Her father, Eduardo Cansino, was from Castilleja de la Cuesta, a little town near Seville, Spain. Her mother, Volga Hayworth, was an American of Irish-English descent who had performed with the Ziegfeld Follies. The Catholic couple had married in 1917. They also had two sons: Eduardo Jr. and Vernon Cansino.

Annex - Hayworth, Rita (Gilda)_07

“We are all tied to our destiny and there is no way we can liberate ourselves.”
Rita Hayworth

6791268739_bec70b3d52_b

Gilda

In person Rita was shy, quiet and unassuming; only when the cameras rolled did she turn on the explosive sexual charisma that in Gilda (1946) made her a superstar. With “Gilda” Rita Hayworth became the major sex symbol of the 40s, a sex symbol that at that time was married to Orson Welles.

Rita Hayworth;Orson Welles [& Wife]

“All I wanted was just what everybody else wants, you know, to be loved.”
Rita Hayworth

1947: Orson Welles and Rita Hayworth, his wife at the time, costarred in Columbia Pictures' The Lady from Shanghai. Welles was also the writer and director of the film. Annex - Hayworth, Rita (Lady From Shanghai, The)_NRFPT_02

Both coincide in one of the masterpieces of the great director, “The Lady from Shanghai” (1948). Welles, in the process of divorce from Rita, dyed her hair blonde and cut off her famous red hair.

ladyfromshanghai

Captura de pantalla 2013-05-09 a la(s) 11.41.31

“Increasingly, stars are recruited from the ranks of professional models, with the result that today’s starlets are better dressed and better groomed than ever before, though it is doubtful if they are better actresses.”
Rita Hayworth

tumblr_mi6vw792Cl1qk2ek1o1_1280

Married 5 times: Edward C. Judson (1937–1942), Orson Welles (1943–1948), Prince Aly Khan (1949–1953), Dick Haymes (1953–1955), James Hill (1958–1961). She had two children, Rebecca Welles, and Yasmin Aly Khan. Alzheimer’s disease lead her to death at the age of 68 years on May 14, 1987.

Rita-Hayworth-rita-hayworth-8642092-983-1280

One thought on “Rita Hayworth

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s